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3 Credits

Requirement Designation: Humanities Exploration


Video Games and Storytelling explores the interplay between game and story in video game media. Students will play and analyze video games, specifically those with strong narratives, and engage with broader literary/theoretical issues in video game and literary studies. Texts include video games themselves, as well as a selection of films, fiction, and critical/theoretical resources.

REQUIRED TEXTS

  • Coin-operated arcade games including Pong, Space Invaders, Pac-Man, Defender, Berzerk, Tempest, Joust, Donkey Kong, and Dragon’s Lair
  • Early console games including Adventure for Atari 2600
  • Early Text Adventure games such as Colossal Cave Adventure and Zork

More recent video games include…

  • Superbrothers: Sword & Sworcery EP
  • Photopia
  • Thomas Was Alone
  • Her Story
  • The Stanley Parable
  • Shelter (the badger simulator!)
  • Papers, Please

Assigned books include Ernest Cline’s novel Ready Player One and Understanding Video Games (3rd Edition). Films and video include Charlie Brooker’s How Video Games Changed the World, The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarers, and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World. (NOTE: some alterations to books and games might occur.)

3 Credits

Requirement Designation: Fine Arts Exploration


Introduction to the writing of fiction and poetry.

3 Credits

Requirement Designation: Diversity & Humanities Exploration


Readings in American literature emphasizing works by and about diverse cultural groups.

 3 Credits

Enrollment Requirement: 
Prerequisites: ENGL 3850 OR ENGL 2600


Introduction to the longstanding debate about literature’s status and value and about the nature of reading and interpretation, with a survey of some of the most seminal approaches to these questions. Strongly recommended as preparation of advanced theory courses. Also fulfills the upper division writing/communication requirement.

3 Credits

Enrollment Requirement: 
Prerequisites: ENGL 3850 OR ENGL 2600


INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY HISTORY, I (online) will introduce you to some of the most important English literary texts produced over a thousand years, from the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf to Alexander Pope’s mock-epic The Rape of the Lock. Our first responsibility will be to understand these works on their own terms—bearing in mind that there may be many sorts of “terms” appropriate to these widely varied texts. Much of our time in class will be spent on close reading. At the same time, we will try to see what patterns these texts fall into. What’s the logic of parceling centuries into capitalized periods (the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Eighteenth Century)? How do literary genres inflect the meaning of individual texts? How do genres, which are supposed to be timeless, change? We will try to arrive at a larger sense of the cultural forces, from social structures to literary conventions, that shaped these texts. We will get at these contexts both inductively, through our close readings, and also by means of the introductions to historical periods and individual authors in the Norton Anthology: it is important that you always read these, in addition to the assignments in your reading schedule. Finally, we will be thinking about the issues raised by the very idea of a survey course: what is literary history? How do texts speak to each other across centuries? How do anthologies get written, and how should we read them?

Literary History 2 is the second of two literary history gateway courses for the English major (though non-majors are always welcome). We will read British and American works from the end of the eighteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century and explore the two most important literary movements from the era, Romanticism and Modernism. Readings will include works by Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Emily Brontë, Emerson, Whitman, Eliot, Yeats, Toomer, and Woolf.

3 Credits

Cross-listed: GNDR 3730
Requirement Designation: Humanities Exploration


Situations of women writers, and images of women’s lives in their fiction. Literary forms and techniques by and about women.

3 Credits

Total Completions Allowed: 3 Total Units Allowed: 15
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: ENGL 3850.
Requirement Designation: Upper Division Communication/Writing


 

3 Credits

Total Completions Allowed: 5 Total Units Allowed: 15
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: ENGL 3850 OR ENGL 2600.


Advanced course on Shakespeare

3 Credits

Total Completions Allowed: 5 Total Units Allowed: 15
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: ENGL 3850.


Advanced course on Victorian Literature

3 Credits

Total Completions Allowed: 5 Total Units Allowed: 15
Enrollment Requirement: Prerequisites: ENGL 3850.


Advanced course on Contemporary Literature

Last Updated: 3/5/18